FREE SHIPPING IN THE U.S.

Fall / Winter '16 Style Guide

November 10, 2016 1 Comment

Fall / Winter '16 Style Guide

O'Douds is and has always been dedicated to ethical sourcing and manufacturing. We strive to fulfill these visions not only in our company but also in our personal lives. To that end, we are proud to announce our very first seasonal Style Guide. 

Our seasonal style guides will be used as a way to help you make ethical buying decisions in areas outside of cosmetics. When it comes down to it, buying ethically-sourced clothing is extremely difficult and often far too expensive. We've been in that position before, and while we may not have the capabilities to produce clothing, we do have the ability to find people who do! For each style guide, we will be partnering with brands that maintain ethical production standards, are affordable, and make great looking clothes and accessories. Our hope is that you might find some new favorite brands, and that we will all work together to push the industry in a positive and ethical direction.

If you aren't sure why buying ethically sourced clothing is so important, we recommend starting with this website and the True Cost Documentary (on Netflix). Remember, research things for yourself, but we have no doubt you'll quickly see how bad the garment industry can be.

Clean Clothes Campaign

The True Cost


 

O'Douds Fall / Winter '16 Style Guide

 


Featured: Everlane Slim Pant, Everlane Striped Tee

Everlane

What they do: Basics - Casual & Dress. Men & Women. Everlane has a special way of doing basics that just seems to always work. With minimalistic designs, their clothing has an incredible amount of versatility. Whether you need casual pants, tees, dress shirts, dress pants, jackets or hoodies, they've got you covered.
Pricing: $15 - $100. One look at Everlane and you may think "yeah this looks great, but no way am I affording it", but guess what, you're wrong. Everlane does not do any wholesale, which allows them to be priced far below their competitors. They also list the exact costs of every item, broken down by things like materials, labor, and shipping.

 

 


Featured: Everlane Slim PantNisolo Emilio ChukkaMack Weldon Socks

Mack Weldon

What they do: Socks, Underwear, & Casual Basics. We initially reached out to Mack Weldon about their awesome socks and underwear, but they do all sorts of casual basics, ranging from tees and polos to sweatpants.
Pricing: $14 - $88. Mack Weldon has some seriously competitive pricing for a company with ethical sourcing. Plus, they've got some great "packs" of items. One, for example, is two pairs of socks for just $16.

 

 


Featured: Everlane Slim PantNisolo Emilio Chukka

Nisolo

What they do: Shoes & Leather. Men & Women. Nisolo makes high-quality shoes in styles ranging from loafers to boots and chukkas. The craftsmanship that goes into every pair of shoes from this company is absolutely top notch. 
Pricing: $148 - $248. In our opinion, pricing is where Nisolo shines the most. They must have some sort of a secret, because we haven't seen anyone else that can produce high quality boots at these price points. These shoes will last a lifetime, and oh my do they look incredible. 

 

 


Featured: Benjamin Bott WrenEverlane Slim PantEverlane Striped Tee, Mack Weldon Underwear

Benjamin Bott

What they do: Leather Wallets. Unisex. There's more than a few wallet makers around these days, but Benjamin Bott stands apart. From the quality of the leather and leatherwork to the vast range of wallets they make, you can't go wrong here.
Pricing: $40 - $240. The great thing about Benjamin Bott is that you can find a wallet to fit any budget. They have plenty of styles to choose from, with countless leather, color, and thread options. 

 





1 Response

Josh
Josh

November 14, 2016

This isn’t a slight to you guys because your intentions are really good and not a lot of people know this but Everlane may not be as socially and environmentally conscious as they say they want to be. http://projectjust.com/brand_everlane/

I do think they’re better than a vast majority of brands just in the fact that they are checking conditions in factories at times but they’re definitely not as transparent as they make out to be. I don’t think they’re on the same level as you guys in terms of your mission.

I’m not saying they’re the worst people in the world and we should turn against them but it’s always good to have more info

Leave a comment